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Racial Equity

'Goodness' is not a miracle cure for racism

There was a time I liked to think of myself as a good person. Like most “good people” if you had asked me if I was racist I would have answered with a resounding “Of course not!” But I have come to learn it’s not that simple. Growing up as a mixed brown and white woman in a mostly white suburb I was used to being on the lookout for micro-aggressions and outright hostility. What evaded me was the idea that I could be continuing the cycle of racism. “I’m brown, so obviously I’m not racist” was a favorite refrain.

One community’s journey from a small local dialogue to becoming a national partner

Public engagement isn’t always easy, but it’s a necessary part of making communities work for everyone. For the last 16 years, residents in Palm Beach County, Fla., have been using Everyday Democracy’s dialogue-to-change process to work on issues of race, early childhood education, and building strong neighborhoods.

The Sojourner Syndrome: An intersectional approach to health inequality

One way to approach reproductive health inequality is the Sojourner Syndrome: an intersectional approach that examines how racism, classism and gender operate in the lives of Black women produce increased risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and infant mortality. Here is one woman's story and how we can approach this issue to make real change.

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Dialogue to Change

Our ultimate goal is to create positive community change that includes everyone, and we believe that our tools, advice, and resources will help foster that kind of change. Whether you’re grappling with a divisive community issue, or simply want to include residents’ voices in city government, Everyday Democracy's Dialogue-to-Change process can help community members take action and make their voice heard.